NBC ‘Celebrates America’ By Hailing Black Lives Matter Activist

0
1


Apparently NBC’s idea of patriotism is cheering on a radical Marxist organization determined on bringing about “revolution” across the United States. On Tuesday, that’s how the Today show chose to prepare for the upcoming July 4th holiday, by celebrating Black Lives Matter Pittsburgh founder Tanisha Long as a “hometown hero fighting for social justice.”

After welcoming Long on the broadcast as a “rising star in Pittsburgh,” co-host Craig Melvin made it clear he was on board with her group’s far-left agenda to remake American society: “Tanisha Long has been an advocate for the black community in Pittsburgh for more than a decade. A hometown hero fighting for social justice and better education in her home state.”

 

 

What media figures like Melvin don’t want the public to know is that the Black Lives Matter national organization was founded by self-avowed “trained Marxists” who consider domestic terrorists to be their personal heroes:

Black Lives Matter – Marxist Revolutionaries

While the leftist media cheer on Black Lives Matter protesters marching in the streets, tearing down statues, and even sparking violence, what reporters don’t want people to know is that the group was founded by self-avowed “Marxists” who demand “revolution” and seek to unmake American society. The Media Research Center is committed to telling the truth about the left, unlike the compliant press that push its extreme views.

– Black Lives Matter was founded in 2013 by “three radical Black organizers.” One of those co-founders, Patrisse Cullors, revealed in a 2015 interview that she and her comrades were “trained Marxists.”

– Cullors was mentored for years by Eric Mann, a member of the far-left domestic terrorist organization Weather Underground. She also has named wanted cop-killer Assata Shakur (Real name: Joanne Chesimard) as a “leader” that “inspires” her.  

– On its website, under “What We Believe,” Black Lives Matter proclaims: “We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and ‘villages’ that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.”

– In a video entitled “Now, We Transform,” the BLM website hails the radical movement as “a watershed moment that has brought the world to its knees.” The page further asserts: “This is the revolution.”

– Fundraising for Black Lives Matter has been conducted by the left-wing group Thousand Currents, which has a convicted terrorist on its board of directors.

– The president of Greater New York Black Lives Matter, Hawk Newsome, has warned that “if this country doesn’t give us what we want, then we will burn down this system and replace it.”

This is the extremism at the heart of the Black Lives Matter movement. The fact that the media actively support the group and refuse to tell the public the truth about its radical beliefs only proves that many in the press are eager for a far-left “revolution” to upend the entire American way of life.

Melvin marveled over Long becoming part of the extreme group: “After the death of George Floyd, Tanisha took charge of her local social justice movement….Creating BLM Pittsburgh in June, a group that’s now more than 6,000 strong.” To do his part in advancing the radicals, he proclaimed: “A sign, Tanisha says, that the Burgh is ready to take on racial injustice and help inspire real revolutionary change.”

As the taped portion of the segment ended, Melvin applauded: “Some people talk, some people do. Tanisha Long is a doer.”

He then fretted over people challenging Black Lives Matter: “Sometimes when folks here ‘black lives matter,’ the response is “all lives matter.” What’s your response to that?” Long lectured viewers about such dissent:

If it makes it a little bit more palatable for them, just think of it as “black lives matter, too.” Until black lives matter to everyone, all lives can’t matter. And if you can watch videos of black men and women in positions where they’re being murdered or persecuted and you’re still uncomfortable saying “all lives matter,” then you’re really not understanding the point. So think of it as “black lives matter, too,” if it makes it easier for you. But we have to say it.

As the nation prepares to celebrate its independence, NBC is preparing for a new “revolution” that seeks to discard America’s founding principles and replace them with the arbitrary whims of the left-wing mob.

This Black Lives Matter propaganda was brought to viewers by Value City Furniture (company contact info is linked, let them know what you think of them sponsoring such content).

Here is a full transcript of the June 30 segment:

8:38 AM ET

CRAIG MELVIN: Let’s look for Tanisha Long. Where’s Tanisha? Tanisha, where are you?

TANISHA LAW: Hi!

MELVIN: There you are.

CARSON DALY: Good morning.

MELVIN: By the way, I love the t-shirt. We’re going to talk to Tanisha in just a moment. But first, just a quick look why Tanisha is such a rising star in Pittsburgh.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: #MyTODAYPlaza Celebrates America; Meet the Steel City Hero Making a Difference]

TANISHA LONG: My name is Tanisha Long, I’m an activist from the Pittsburgh area, I am the founder of Black Lives Matter Pittsburgh and Southwestern PA.

MELVIN: Tanisha Long has been an advocate for the black community in Pittsburgh for more than a decade. A hometown hero fighting for social justice and better education in her home state. She’s raised thousands of dollars to get books about civil rights and black history to kids in underserved neighborhoods.

LONG: We have so many kids who just grow up thinking that their options are limited because they have never seen people who look like them in these spaces. To be able to give kids that and have them feature characters that look like them is something super special.

MELVIN: After the death of George Floyd, Tanisha took charge of her local social justice movement.

LONG: Everybody’s been walking up, saying, “What can we do? What’s next?”

MELVIN: Creating BLM Pittsburgh in June, a group that’s now more than 6,000 strong.

LONG: Black, white, Hispanic, Asian, everybody. Our crowds have been so diverse. It’s been astounding.

MELVIN: A sign, Tanisha says, that the Burgh is ready to take on racial injustice and help inspire real revolutionary change.

LONG: People are starting to move and they’re starting to do things in a way that’s actionable. This is probably the closest we’ve been to change in Pittsburgh in decades.

MELVIN: Some people talk, some people do. Tanisha Long is a doer.

Hey, Tanisha, just, first of all, Black Lives Matter. You started the chapter there. Sometimes when folks here “black lives matter,” the response is “all lives matter.” What’s your response to that?

LONG: If it makes it a little bit more palatable for them, just think of it as “black lives matter, too.” Until black lives matter to everyone, all lives can’t matter. And if you can watch videos of black men and women in positions where they’re being murdered or persecuted and you’re still uncomfortable saying “all lives matter,” then you’re really not understanding the point. So think of it as “black lives matter, too,” if it makes it easier for you. But we have to say it.

MELVIN: What’s your favorite part of Pittsburgh? What do you love most about that city?

LONG: Oh, my gosh, the community. The fact that I was able to start an unofficial chapter of Black Lives Matter and have everybody rally around it and everybody get excited and everybody just pitch in. And everybody says it’s the Steel City and it’s Steelers City, but honestly, it’s just a city of, like, pride, love, and acceptance. It’s been great.

MELVIN: We want to just highlight you and showcase some of the work you’ve been doing. Carson and I were just talking about the shirt. Folks can’t see the whole shirt, can you stand up just for a second so people can see the “Dream like Martin” – there you go. “Fight like Malcolm, think like Garvey, write like Maya yet fight like Malcolm write like Maya.”

DALY: Oh, nice.

MELVIN: Tanisha, thank you.

SAVANNAH GUTHRIE: Thank you, Tanisha.

MELVIN: Thanks so much for all you’re doing in Pittsburgh. Can we bring the board back one more time.

DALY: Nice work, Tanisha.

LONG: Thank you.



Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.